Best rock station ever?

Ok, right now I live in the middle of nowhere, which means our variety of radio station absolutely sucks. So whenever I have the chance I listen to radio online, and this by far the best station ever! If you are a rock fan you will be in heaven! Click on the link and then click the listen live button on the right side bar

http://www.wmmr.com/

Free Legal Punk Music (What could be better?)

We all know that usually downloading music from the internet is illegal and wrong, right? (please just nod and say yes) However it can be legal if the music is downloaded from a group that has the right to distribute it such as the band itself, the recording company, or maybe a sponsor. Yesterday I was doing some research and found several totally awesome sites where you can get free and COMPLETELY LEGAL music downloads. Many of them are punk, because it seems that most punk artists are a lot less comericialized and a lot more generous than other genres of music. (seriously, it’s true)

So check out these awesome sites! All of them are linked in the sidebar

1.  Altsounds – You have to scroll around to be able to find all the artists, but once you do it is totally worth it! Most of these bands are emo/screamo. Includes Anberlin, Panic! at the Disco, UnderOath, Red Jumpsuit, etc

2. iLike – Most of the downloads from this site are from bands without recording contracts yet, but there are still a few pretty amazing ones! Check out Brokenfall and Superbeing, they totally rock!

3.  GarageBand – Another great site for discovering bands without recording contracts. Also a great site for new musicians to promote their music

4. Fat Wreck Chords – Punk recording label, and they have some pretty great downloads if you are into real  punk. Includes NOFX, Rise Against, No Use For A Name and Propaghandhi

5. Hellcat Records – Punk and Hardcore recording label, and more rockin’ MP3s. Includes Rancid, Nekromantix, and Horrorpops

6. StereoKiller – Umm…Interesting. But they do have several good downloads including a few by Underoath

7. Anti-, just a really cool site with downloads from Greg Graffin (Lead singer of Bad Religion – I love this guy!) and Michael Franti

8.  3hive – It has a few  pretty cool downloads including Dropkick Murphys and Flogging Molly

9. Mp3.com – Millions upon millions of songs and downloads, but I didn’t recognize even a single artist. However you might be able to find some good stuff in here

10. PureVolume – I love this site! There is a ton of music, and much of it is by popular mainstream artists. I have found free downloads from Demon Hunter, Paramore, Anberlin and other awesome bands. You can find music from pretty much any genre ever created!

A few other sites that I didn’t find worthy enough to put in the sidebar: Stereogum, bt.etree.org, SoundClick, Honc. biz, Jamendo, Epitonic, SubPop records, MTV, and iSound. You might be able to find something good on them, it just takes more effort than I am willing to spend!

Death Cab for Cutie

Death Cab for Cutie was created in only 1997 though they have the sound of a much older polished band. They were named after a 1967 song by  the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band.  They started as a small little known band from Washington state, and produced their music through Barsuk Records.

Then in 2004 they signed a deal with the large Atlantic records, and their fame continued to grow. Their music can be found all over in soundtracks, including their new song “Meet Me on the Equinox” which is one of the main singles for the movie New Moon.

Death Cab has a very unique sound that is entirely their own, but not everyone likes it. Many of my friends for some reason seem to hate them with a deep loathing that I cannot understand. Another interesting thing is that the a new band called Owl City seems to have taken the same musical approach as Death Cab, in fact they sound very similar.

At the Mercy of the Thorns

I realize I haven’t posted in a while, but I hadn’t heard a song that really “struck me” to right about – until last week. I had heard this song once before, loved it, but then totally forgot about it until Iwas playing around with my Youtube channel while studying. The song is called Thorns by Demon Hunter, but you don’t have to be a metal fan to be able to appriciate it.

Here is the video with lyrics, there is also a fan made graphic version that I didn’t post.

I just really connected with this song from the first time I heard it.  The meaning and implications of this song are just so deep it’s hard to even comprehend. It’s about self-injury, but unlike so many other songs about the same topic, it shows a different depth to it.  Basically the song is saying that we don’t have to  hurt ourselves for what we do, Jesus has taken the punishment of bleeding for us.  It is no longer our burden to bear, and we can give it up to  him.

I am not sure if this has the same meaning to anyone else that it does for me, but I thought I would share anyway. I guess you might not be able to understand the emotion unless you have been in that place. I think this song can apply to anyone – not just those who physically hurt themselves. We all have a tendancy to beat our selves up (emotionally, physically or mentally) over stuff that happens, and there comes a time we just need to let go.

Here is a quote from the band:

“In the few months before I began writing lyrics for this record, I was hearing a lot about cutting. This, for those who don’t know is the act of inflicting pain on one’s self (often times by cutting with a knife, or burning with a lighter) in order to take their mind off of some emotional pain. Although I don’t personally know anyone who has dealt with this (that I am aware of), the idea of writing a song about it was really placed on my heart. I guess I thought I might be able to speak to some young people about this particular issue. I couldn’t help but draw a connection between someone wanting to inflict pain on themselves and Jesus having been sacrificed so that we wouldn’t need to bare the guilt of sin. My thought was that Christ had already been cut for us, so there was no need for us to inflict pain on ourselves. That work has been paid for in full by the cross. The chorus lyrics hope that this person (represented by a young female in the song) might find this truth in her darkest of times, when she realizes that the emptiness she hoped would leave after inflicting this pain, still remains. Her flesh, broken, is emptiness. Christ’s flesh broken is mercy for us.” – Demon Hunter

For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in him, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross. -Colossians 1:19, 20

Emotive, Unstable…..

Music changes lives, and there is one band that single handedly changed mine – Anberlin. My blog name (Unwindingcablecar) is named after their song Unwinding Cable Car, which is a beautiful and inspiring song.

Stephen Christian’s vocals soar, and contain so much raw emotion it’s impossible to make it through an entire cd without digging deep into your own feelings. Surprisingly enough, they are not well known, which somehow makes their discovery a rare and precious surprise. In a culture of trashy, unrefined, and boringly repetitive music, a band like Anberlin is rare indeed. While they aren’t the typical style of music I usually listent to, they have remained my favorite band consistantly!

Here is a link to their site, I would highly encourage you to read the biography. I would have posted it, but the site wouldn’t let me! Anberlin‘s site

One of the other amazing things is that no two of their Cds are alike, each has it’s own style and themes. They range from screaming (The original Feel Good Drag), to very indie sounding acoustics (acoustic A Day Late). Yet another spectacular thing is that they do “doubles” of some of their songs, meaning they have both a original version, and an acoustic or new version.  Most of the songs off of “Lost Songs” are different versions, and they recently remade “Feel Good Drag” off of one of their other Cds!

Reviews from Amazon:

Never Take Friendship Personal (2005) – There’s only one word that comes immediately to mind when describing Anberlin’s Never Take Friendship Personal release. The word? Amazing. This is one of those truly remarkable releases that is so refreshing, so defining, and so well done, you will feel a need to let every know about it. Much like Switchfoot’s The Beautiful Letdown and D.C. Talk’s Jesus Freak, Anberlin’s second release captures the musical styles of the day but recasts them in a unique and exciting way. Much credit up front should go to producer Aaron Sprinkle, who never lets the music overshadow Steven Christian’s emotive alto vocals. Joseph Milligan’s guitar work is nothing short of phenomenal and propels such blistering tracks like “Paperthin Hymn,” “Runaways,” and “Feel Good Drag.” Let’s not forget the rock-steady rhythm from drummer Nathan Young and bassist Deon Rexroat that continually lays down a concrete foundation. Also worthy of note is the intelligent songwriting that prevails throughout the release, showing that Christian-based bands don’t always check their brains at the studio door. Moody at times, exhilarating at others, this is a giant leap forward for a relative newcomer in Christian music. It’s also a release worthy of widespread acclaim and a breath of fresh air in a genre that is sadly growing all too predictable

Cities (2007) – Unlike most emo bands that merely offer a laundry list of personal hardships over the sound of loud guitars, the members of Anberlin know that they can seek salvation in a higher power, so the songs on Cities aren’t so much about self-pity as self-preservation. It’s a refreshing twist on the formula, especially when paired with the industrial-strength hooks the spiritual Florida band knocks out on tracks like “Dismantle. Repair.” and “Godspeed.” On the latter, the group’s frontman Stephen Christian lashes out against the bad habits of his secular counterparts: “Tell them who you were, who you really were/Kill yourself slowly over time, fashion statement suicide.”

Other Cds include New Surrender (2009), Lost Songs (2007), and Blueprints for the Black Market (2003)

About the Artist

In today’s instantly downloadable and quickly consumed culture, bands like Anberlin are a dying breed. Over the course of six years and four full-lengths (including last year’s B-side compilation Lost Songs), the band have established themselves as one of alternative rock’s most exciting acts and as a band who refuse to limit themselves to one specific scene or sound… and it’s paid off. If the band reinvented themselves with last year’s sprawling album Cities–which debuted in the Billboard Top 20 and sold 34,000 copies its first week of release–they’ve transcended that sound with New Surrender. In fact, their latest album that shows the band reconciling all of their seemingly disparate moods into a cohesive blend of music that will lull you to sleep with gentle harmonies one minute and shake you to the core via raw, distortion-drenched rock riffage the next.This control of dynamics has embodied Anberlin’s music since their 2003 debut Blueprints For The Black Market which instantly caught on with fans of emotional music who didn’t want to be fed the same musical clichés–oh, and touring alongside acts like Fall Out Boy and My Chemical Romance to support that album didn’t hurt either. After playing literally hundreds of shows and growing as both musicians and people the band released their sophomore album Never Take Friendship Personal in 2005. Markedly more mature both musically and lyrically, that album established Anberlin as more than another underground sensation and showed that there was no limit to what the band could achieve. This same trend was evident with last year’s mainstream breakthrough Cities, which showed the band progressing even more and expanding their musical vision exponentially.

All this brings us to New Surrender. Although the album retains the Anberlin sound that fans have grown to love, in many ways it’s also an album of firsts that marks the next chapter in the band’s illustrious history. For example, after working for years exclusively with longtime producer/friend Aaron Sprinkle this time around the band decided to enlist legendary producer Neal Avron (Fall Out Boy, Yellowcard, New Found Glory) to capture their sound. Additionally, after selling 435,000 albums on the well-respected indie label Tooth And Nail, with New Surrender the band decided it was finally time for them to step up to a major label–and although they had been courted by various majors for years, the band decided to go with Universal Republic. “At Tooth And Nail there was a glass ceiling and there was no way to get our music out to all the people we wanted to reach,” Christian explains when asked about the band’s decision to change labels. “To us, Universal Republic represents a sense of stability in this turbulent

era for music: The staff is going nowhere, the label is here to stay and they have proven time and time again that they can take bands to the people–and that is where we belong… among the people.”

“The whole album is conceptualized around the theme of a new surrender in the sense that everyone in their lives has something they know they have to give up,” responds Christian when asked about the title of the band’s latest opus. “There’s something that’s holding each of us back from who we could become, so I think each song kind of tackles that theme of surrendering parts of life whether it’s a person or a vice.” In order to capture this idea, the band–which also features guitarist Joseph Milligan, bassist Deon Rexroat, drummer Nathan Young and new addition and former Acceptance guitarist Christian McAlhaney–spent three months in the studio with Avron carefully crafting their most fully realized effort to date.

In fact, from the equally cathartic and melodic track “Breaking” to the soon-to-be summertime anthem “Haight Street” and acoustic ballad “Younglife,” New Surrender is the most varied album of the band’s career–something they credit largely to the new addition of McAlhaney, who has solidified the band’s lineup and become an integral part of the songwriting process. “I think it just felt right,” McAlhaney responds when asked when it was like to be thrown into a songwriting team of Christian and Milligan, who have been writing together for nearly thirteen years. “There was no trial period, we just went for it,” he continues. “It definitely helped having someone else to bounce ideas off of,” Milligan concurs, adding that he’s confident that New Surrender is undoubtedly the band’s strongest album to date.

Although both of the band’s guitarists have completely different styles, they perfectly complement each both rhythmically and melodically on New Surrender–and this sonic interaction has added a new level of depth to Anberlin’s already powerful sound. Additionally, this renewed sense of enthusiasm doesn’t just apply to the guitars but also carries over to Stephen’s vocals, which manage to achieve almost religious levels of grandeur on the falsetto-fueled “Retrace” or soaring, operatic ballad “Breathe.” “Neal [Avron] did not let me get away with anything,” Christian explains, noting that every vocal part on the album is sung individually without relying on studio trickery such as auto-tuning. While this unorthodox approach required additional work on the band’s part, the result is a vocal performance that shows Christian extending his already impressive range and solidifying him as one of the strongest frontman in the genre.

New Surrender is also the first Anberlin album to work the band’s well-documented humanitarian efforts into the lyrics, which have included going to Kenya to teach about AIDS prevention or traveling to Calcutta, India, to educate the masses about the danger of human trafficking. “I live in Los Angeles now, so

I wrote a song [Disappear] about homelessness because that’s something that’s so prevalent in my life,” Christian elaborates. “There’s also about another song [Burn Out Brighter (Northern Lights)] about living unselfishly and the lyrics say, “‘I want to live and die for someone else / the more I live, I see this life’s not about me,'” he adds. “I’m really excited that we’ve got to the level lyrically where our fans don’t listen to Anberlin for just the basic, `Oh girl, I want to hold your hand,” he says, noting that the supportive nature of Anberlin’s fans gave him artistic license to challenge himself and take his own writing to the next level this time around.

However, the band are quick to stress the fact that New Surrender is ultimately an album that’s made to be listened to instead of analyzed–and songs like “Feel Good Drag” are so infectious that it’s likely that listeners will be too wrapped up in the majesty of the music to waste their time worrying about how to pigeonhole Anberlin’s sound. “In some ways I don’t think we have that much emotional attachment to music nowadays,” Christian says, noting that music seems to be such a ubiquitous part of our daily lives that it’s easy to forget the passion that initially drew most of us to it the first place. “I want people to feel like they belong to this record; it’s their record and I want them to treat it like that,” he explains. “Hopefully New Surrender doesn’t just have one single that everyone attaches himself or herself to,” he summarizes, “I really want all twelve songs to be a part of their lives.”

Memento Mori?

The very same metal band that started appearing on stage all over the world several years ago is finally coming out with their second album – Memento Mori. “It is a Latin phrase meaning “Remember you will die”. It names a genre of artistic creations that vary widely from one another, but which all share the same purpose: to remind people of their own mortality.” (lovely wikipedia quote).

New Single!

Here is a awesome biography from amazon! –

“The Belton, TX-based heavy rock quintet Flyleaf formed in 2000 when frontwoman Lacey Mosley tried out a string of the dark, hard-edged songs she consistently wrote as a brooding teen on drummer James Culpepper. After a brief period of playing together, they recruited guitarists Sameer Bhattacharya and Jared Hartmann, members of a local outfit that had recently called it quits. In 2002, bassist Pat Seals joined, and the band, initially known as Passerby, was born.

The road to Flyleaf’s 2005 self-titled debut on Octone Records was dotted with more green lights than red: the band played wherever it was invited around its home state at first, gradually building the kind of fan base that allowed it to open for acts such as Bowling for Soup, Fishbone, and Riddlin’ Kids. By 2003, with word of Mosley’s arsenic-laced lyrics and blow-torch-style delivery spreading through Texas and beyond, Flyleaf earned a spot at the annual South by Southwest music conference. A contract from Octone was rushed to the signing stages by 2004.

An EP, issued in early 2005 and also called Flyleaf, benefited from the un-obscure production team of Rick Parasher (Pearl Jam, Blind Melon) and Brad Cook (Foo Fighters, Queens of the Stone Age). Key tracks such as the roiling “Cassie” and the emo-tinged “Breathe Today,” both of which appear on the full-length, furthered Flyleaf’s reputation, as did raging live shows alongside Saliva, Breaking Benjamin, 3 Doors Down, and Staind.

For the fall 2005 release, producer Howard Benson (My Chemical Romance, Papa Roach, the All-American Rejects) joined Flyleaf in Los Angeles. A batch of 20 songs was winnowed to 12, with Mosley’s searing vocals and Bhattacharya’s and Hartmann’s storming guitars offsetting each other to effect a sound by turns morose, compassionate, hope-swollen, and bitter.

The moodiness befits Mosley’s background: as one of six siblings in a single-parent household, the confessional songwriter spent her childhood moving from apartment to apartment whenever the bills went unpaid. She openly acknowledges an early addiction to drugs and alcohol that fueled bouts of depression. As of the release of Flyleaf’s full-length, the band was committed to sobriety.”

They are also a Christian band, which few people realize .Mosley said. “I don’t know the answer. We’re a band, it’s part of who we are, so it comes out in our music, and it’s the fuel for what we do. And finding faith saved my life. So I’m not ashamed of it at all. And most of our album reflects that.

Red!

Ok, I tried to embed some music by Red in here, but that was less than successful. I guess I will just stick a few videos in or something like that.  For those of you who don’t know Red, they are this amazing Christian metal group, but you would never guess that they are Christian from the sound. They sound sort of like a cross between Breaking Benjamin and Three Days Grace, and look like Demon Hunter. I saw them for the first time in concert about two years ago (the most pit was insane), and just fell in love!  The lyrics are dark and inspiring, and they have great voices with a great metal sound. Since then I have bought both their Cds (End of Silence, and Innocence & Instinct), seen them again in concert, and met them, and they continue to inspire and amaze me to no end. Just the title of their second CD is enough to make you go “wow”.

Listen to this-

It’s one of their softer songs, but so insanely beautiful.

This one is Shadows – co-written by Ben Burnley of Breaking Benjamin!

I found this article on their website this morning, and thought it was particularly cool! Sorry, I know it’s long!

“Still riding the momentum of its huge-selling Grammy-nominated debut album End of Silence, Red returns with Innocence & Instinct, a provocative new album forged in a perfect storm of inspiration and catastrophe. From the literary spark of Dante’s Inferno to the bloody aftermath of a 75-mph highway crash, Red absorbed a flood of ideas and emotions that empowered the band to create next generation rock songs. Finding the sonic sweet spot where epic and primal converge, Innocence & Instinct features animated dynamics that super-charge its innocence vs. instinct theme.


“Innocence & Instinct is about the duality of man,” explains guitarist Jasen Rauch. “The album examines the fight between our childlike innocence and the instinctive side that makes us do things we shouldn’t.”

The group’s debut, which sold over a quarter-million copies and earned several awards and nominations, focused heavily on personal struggles. Bringing back Silence producer Rob Graves and mixer Ben Grosse (Sevendust, Disturbed, Depeche Mode), Innocence & Instinct goes a giant step further by tackling the fight itself. It’s about the dueling impulses that wage war within our souls.


In writing the album, Red found Inferno to be an illuminating guide. The literary classic, which starts with Dante and Virgil standing before the Gates of Hell, illustrated ways in which the band might tackle deep issues in a more poetic way. And if Dante enhanced the storytelling, a highway crash in late ’07 accelerated the band’s emotional core. As the tour van smashed into a guardrail and violently slid sideways across the highway, the band experienced new heights of horror that they channeled into Innocence & Instinct.


“It brought an intensity and depth that we couldn’t reach without going through this experience,” Rauch reflects. “In the months after the accident, it felt like everything was in overdrive.”


“In a split second, it changed our lives,” adds six-stringer Anthony Armstrong, whose twin brother Randy handles the band’s basslines.


Setting the tone early, “Fight Inside” rides beautiful piano keys to an unforgettable chorus as glaring agitation builds to a savage finish. The song epitomizes the album’s effortless transitions between simmering angst, melodic hooks and pretty major-key resolves, while its inner-monologue sets up the lyrical theme by cursing the frail duality of innocence and instinct. “Death of Me” furthers the first-person schizophrenia as vocalist Michael Barnes cries “You tear me down and then you pick me up” against a backdrop of deafening guitars, sweeping symphonics and nerve-rattling screams. “Shadows,” co-written by Ben Burnley of Breaking Benjamin, pushes against the darkness while “Out From Under” could be called Fight Club with guitars.


“There are moments that switch between never feeling so close to someone to never feeling so abandoned, but that’s part of the human experience,” says Rauch. “These extreme feelings, these paradoxes, coexist all the time.”


While several songs veer toward an internal apocalypse, “Never Be the Same” personifies Innocence with optimistic reflections poured out over lush fields of electric and acoustic guitars. The piano-powered “Start Again” addresses the conflicted remorse of a failed relationship, while “Mystery of You” ponders the inexplicable over industrial-strength loops and keys. Innocence & Instinct even features a juiced-up cover of Duran Duran’s utopian “Ordinary World.”


Formed in Nashville, Tennessee over four years ago, Red made an immediate impact with its 2006 debut, End of Silence. The Grammy-nominated disc, featuring the radio hits “Breathe Into Me” (Top 10, Active Rock) and “Already Over” (Top 15, Active Rock), introduced the sonic layering, rich orchestration and visceral dynamics that became Red’s signature sound. The album steadily built momentum cracking the Billboard 200 a year after its release as sales steadily broke out to hundreds of thousands of copies sold. Not surprisingly, the album became a hit with other bands as well, leading to tours and shows with Papa Roach, Sevendust, Three Days Grace, Flyleaf, Buckcherry and Seether, among others. These opportunities contributed to the band’s impressive 500+ live show schedule between albums.


Heading into Innocence & Instinct, Red had no shortage of creative sparks. A near-death accident ignited their emotions, a literary masterpiece spurred their creativity, peer support lifted their spirits, heavy touring empowered their performances and fans challenged the group to do even more to impact their lives. These experiences infused Innocence & Instinct with layered narratives, heightened sensibilities and an artistic boldness that dramatically raises the bar for new millennial rock ‘n’ roll.


In Dante’s Inferno, the Gates of Hell read, “Abandon all hope, ye who enter here.” But when the Gates finally face Innocence & Instinct, Hell won’t know what hit it.”

If you like this band you might also like: Breaking Benjamin, Demon Hunter

  • More Favorite Albums

    Fallen

    Fallen by Evanescence

  • American Idiot

    American Idiot

  • Comatose

    Comatose by Skillet

  • Innocence & Instinct

    Innocence & Instinct by Red

  • Dear Agony

    Dear Agony by Breaking Benjamin

  • Never Take Friendship Personal

    Never Take Friendship Personal by Anberlin

  • Storm the Gates of Hell

    Storm the Gates of Hell by Demon Hunter

  • Scars & Souvenirs

    Scars & Souvenirs by Theory of a Deadman

  • Phobia

    Phobia by Breaking Benjamin